Personal Pronouns

Before you start exploring verb conjugation tables, it is necessary to recognise the Old English personal pronouns which accompany the verbs. Personal pronouns take different forms depending on number, case, and grammatical gender. Personal pronouns are affected by case the same way as regular nouns, which you will see with the words 'I' and 'you' in the example sentences below, but for now let's just look at the nominative forms of the pronouns which appear in the verb tables.

Personal Pronouns
Old English Modern English
1st Person Singular Ic I
2nd Person Singular Þu You
3rd Person Singular He / Heo / Hit He / She / It
1st Person Plural We We
2nd Person Plural Ge Ye / You
3rd Person Plural Hie They

Ic and ge have a palatalized 'c' and 'g'. Ic is pronounced like 'itch', and ge is pronounced 'ye'. Refer back to the beginners pronunciation guide for more information.

A verb almost always has a subject performing the action of the verb, and a verb always agrees with its subject. This means the form of the verb changes depending on its subject. So while in modern English, 'I love you' and 'you love me' use the same form of the verb, in Old English it changes:

Ic
Personal
Pronoun
lufie
1st Person
Verb
þe
Direct
Object
Þu
Personal
Pronoun
lufast
2nd Person
Verb
me
Direct
Object

As you can see, Old English personal pronouns are not that different to modern English ones. You can practice using personal pronouns below. When you're ready, let's take a look at Weak Verbs I and see how Old English verbs work in more detail.

Return to Introduction to Weak Verbs Continue to Weak Verbs I

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